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To visualize the Hebrew language, written from right to left, it is necessary to have Hebrew font in your pc (bwhebb, see Homepage).


 

Names of the numbers

 

Each name in number, together with its numerical value, has also the meaning of its name, expressed by the etymological dictionary.

In the text of the Creation the use of numbers has several expressive features: just as its numerical value, or as the meaning of the name related to the number or with the double function of number and name.

This expressive power of numbers is present wherever they appear: the number of the chapters, the number of the verses, the seven days in which creation is accomplished, the four rivers of Eden or the ten stages, from Adam to Noah, of the creation of individuality, etc.

Each of the ten chapters has its own main topic, which coincides with the meaning of the name of its number and the topic of most verses follows the same logic.

 

 

 

1 One: Unity, the focus, the abstract principle of things; the relative unit, the top, the peak, everything is extreme, initial.

 

2 Two: Mutation, distinction, variation, change, the transition from one condition to another; what divides and measures.

 

3 Three: The proportion of doses, components.

 

4 Four: All ideas of growth and multiplication of the physical reality, of the material development, of all that is sensible, of everything that fall under the senses or the external form of the things.
 

5 Five: Aggregation, sum, union, the complex that makes the existence manifest and evident; which declares it to the senses.

 

6 Six: All the ideas of relative proportion towards every active principle, every relative force; all the ideas of relative proportion towards the basis and foundation of things; all the ideas of relative duration and relative movement.

 

7 Seven: The physical/material generation; the physical/material vivification; the physical/material becoming. All the ideas related making, vivifying, fecundating, creating the physical reality; to carry out the development, the physical growth.

 

8 Eight: All specification, classification by exterior forms; all figuration, determination, definition, distinction, qualification. The kind of things, their exterior figure; their proper measure, number, quota. The action of figuring, defining, forming an idea, an image of things: the action of imagining; the action of measuring, numbering, qualifying, etc.

Form, aspect of things; their figure, etc.

 

9 Nine. Every idea of determination, designation of conservation, cementation; which consolidates, guarantees, preserves. The action of designing, characterizing the conservation, cementation.

 

10 Ten. Every idea of opening, liberation of that which is material, the physical reality, the exterior form of things. That which liberates, opens, brings out, emits the matter, the physical reality, the exterior form of things (as if a closed circle were opened; as if a chain were slackened).

 

Except for number twenty, which is drawn by number ten through the use of the dual, all tens from 30 to 90 are formed from the plural of the primitive number. So that each ten is only the complement of its radical number.

 

100 Hundred: What has developed into the entire extension of its faculties.

 

Day: The luminous manifestation of the matter.

 

Month: Germination, propagation of the existence.

 

Year: Every idea of mutation, of variation, of passing from one state to another; a temporal mutation, relative to the being which is its object.

 







 

dxa

dx      a  or  d     da      xa

1 One: Unity, the focus, the abstract principle of things; the relative unit, the top, the peak, everything is extreme, initial.

 

D’Olivét’ note:   dxa  One. The root  dx  from which this word is formed, and which is sometimes taken for unity itself, particularly in Chaldaic, signifies literally, a point, a summit, the sharpest part of a thing; the top of a pyramid. It is division arrested, subjugated by a sort of effort; as the two signs  d  and  x  which compose it, indicate. In the feminine it is written  txa 

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

xa   AH. The potential sign united to that of elementary existence  x  image of the travail of nature, produces a root whence result all ideas of equilibrium, equality, identity, fraternity. When the sign  x  characterizes principally an effort, the root  xa  takes the meaning of its analogues  ga  and  %a  . and represents a somewhat violent action. It furnishes then all ideas of excitation and becomes the name of the place where the fire is lighted, the hearth.

xa   Brother, kinsman, associate, neighbour: the common hearth where all assemble.

The Arabic (arabic font) contains all the meanings attributed to the Hebrew  x

xa   and  dxa  One: first : all ideas attached to identity, to unity.

da   AD. This root, composed of the signs of power and of physical divisibility, indicates every distinct, single object, taken from the many.

The Arabic (arabic font) conceived in an abstract manner and as adverbial relation, expresses a temporal point, a determined epoch: when, whilst, whereas.

da   That which emanates from a thing: the power of division, relative unity, an emanation; a smoking fire brand.

dWa   (comp.) That which is done because of or on occasion of another thing: an affair, a thing, an occurrence.

d   D. This character as consonant belongs to the dental sound. It appears that in its hieroglyphic acceptation, it was the emblem of the universal quaternary; that is to say, of the source of all physical existence. As symbolic image it represents the breast, and every nourishing and abundant object. As grammatical sign, it expresses in general, abundance born of division: it is the sign of divisible and divided nature. The Hebrew does not employ it as article, but it enjoys that prerogative in Chaldaic, Samaritan and Syriac, where it fulfills the functions of a kind of distinctive article.

 

a  A. First character of the alphabet in nearly all known idioms. As symbolic image it represents universal man, mankind, the ruling being of the earth. In its hieroglyphic acceptation, it characterizes unity, the central point, the abstract principle of a thing. As sign, it expresses power, stability, continuity. Some grammarians make it express a kind of superlative as in Arabic; but this is only a result of its power as sign. On some rare occasions it takes the place of the emphatic article  h  either at the beginning or at the end of words. The rabbis use it as a sort of article. It is often added at the head of words as redundant vowel, to make them more sonorous and to add to their expression.

dx   HED. The power of division, expressed by the root  da   which, arrested by the effort which results from its contraction with the elementary sign  x  , becomes the image of relative unity. It is literally, a sharp thing, a point, a summit.

The Arabic (arabic font) presents in general, the ideas of terminating, determining, circumscribing, limiting. It is, in a more restricted sense, to grind; metaphorically, to punish. This root being reinforced in the verb (arabic font), expresses the action of breaking through and excavating the ground. As noun, (arabic font) signifies literally the cheek.

dx   The point of anything whatever. Everything which pricks, everything which is extreme, initial: metaphorically, a drop of wine; gaiety, lively and piquant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

!v

 !v

2 Two: Mutation, distinction, variation, change, the transition from one condition to another; what divides and measures.

 

D’Olivét’ note:   !v      ynv    or    ~ynv  Two. The root  !v  composed of the sign of relative duration  v  and that of produced being or growth  !  contains all ideas of mutation, of transition, of passing from one state to another, of redundancy. Thus the name of this number in bringing diversity, change and variation, is the opposite in everything from the preceding number, which, as we have seen, arrests division and tends to immutability. The feminine is  tv       ytv  and  ~ytv

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

!v   SHN. All ideas of mutation, iteration, passing from one state to another; that which leads to diversity, variation, change.

The Arabic (arabic font) agrees with the Hebraic root only in certain compounds, and in the analogue (arabic font). As verb, (arabic font) indicates the action of triturating, crushing, making noise.

!v   The number two. Literally, that which cuts and divides as the teeth; figuratively, hatred. That which varies, changes; that which measures and divides time; a cyclic revolution, an ontological mutation; in a very restricted sense, a year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

vwlv

 vl      wv

3 Three: The proportion of doses, components; the proportion of doses of every compound, amalgam

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

Wv   SHOU. Root analogous to the root  av  , but conceived principally under its relation of equilibrium, equality, parallel, similitude, fitness, proportion and measure of things.

vl   LSH. Every union en masse, every forming, composing. (Original French text:  לש  LSH. Tonte réunion en masse, tout pétrissement.)

The Arabic (arabic font) indicates the state of that which is agitated, shaken. The word (arabic font) characterizes one who is trembling, troubled, unsteady. (Original French text: L'ar. لش indique l'état de ce qui est agité, secoué, comme la pâte. Le mot لشللش caractérise un homme tremblant, troublé, chancelant.)

vWl   That which tends to soften, knead; to make ductile a thing which is firm and divided.

(Original French text:  vWl  Ce qui tend à délayer, à pétrir, à rendre ductile une chose dure et divisée.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

[bra

 w[       br      a

4 Four: All ideas of growth and multiplication of the physical reality, of the material development, of all that is sensible, of everything that fall under the senses or the external form of things.

 

D’Olivét’ note:   [bra  The root of this mysterious number is  br  which, formed of the sign of movement proper  r  and that of generative action, contains all ideas of grandeur and of multiplication. If the last character is doubled as in  bbr  this word acquires an endless numerical extent; if it is followed by the sign of material sense, as in  [br  it becomes the expression of solidity, of physical force, and of all ideas attached to the cube. It is in this state that it represents the number four.

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

a   A. First character of the alphabet in nearly all known idioms. As symbolic image it represents universal man, mankind, the ruling being of the earth. In its hieroglyphic acceptation, it characterizes unity, the central point, the abstract principle of a thing. As sign, it expresses power, stability, continuity. Some grammarians make it express a kind of superlative as in Arabic; but this is only a result of its power as sign. On some rare occasions it takes the place of the emphatic article  h  either at the beginning or at the end of words. The rabbis use it as a sort of article. It is often added at the head of words as redundant vowel, to make them more sonorous and to add to their expression.

br   RB. The sign of movement proper, united to that of interior activity, or by contraction with the root  ba  , image of all fructification, constitutes a root whence are developed all ideas of multiplication, augmentation, growth, grandeur: it is a kind of movement toward propagation, physically as well as morally.

The Arabic (arabic font) does not differ from the Hebrew. It is, in general, that which dominates, augments, grows, usurps, possesses, gathers together, governs, etc.

br   and  bbr  (intens.) That which is large, broad, increased, whether in number or in volume; augmented, multiplied; that which is expressed by the adverbial relations, much, more, still more, many; ideas of multitude, number, quantity; strength or power which is drawn from number, etc.

bWr   (comp.) Action of being carried in a mass, of making an uproar raising a quarrel, a dispute.

bhr   (comp.) Every idea of magnitude, grandeur, force. See  br

[   U.H.WH. This character should be considered under the double relation of vowel and consonant. Following its vocal acceptation, it represents the interior of the ear of man, and becomes the symbol of confused, dull, inappreciable noises; deep sounds without harmony. Following its consonantal acceptation, it belongs to the guttural sound and represents the cavity of the chest. Under both relations as grammatical sign, it is in general, that of material sense, image of void and nothingness. As vowel, it is the sign  W  , considered in its purely physical relations: as consonant, it is the sign of that which is crooked, false, perverse and bad.

h[   ,  W[  HEH, HOU. That which is sentient in general; obvious to the senses: physical reality. Superficies, the exterior form of things. Their growth, material development.

hW[   Every inflection, every circumferential form; every kind of curvature, inversion, circle, cycle; everything concave or convex. In a figurative sense perversion, iniquity; state of being perverse, iniquitous, deceitful, vicious.

 

 

 

 

 

 

vmx

 vm      wx

5 Five: Aggregation, sum, union, the complex that makes the existence manifest and evident; which declares it to the senses.

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

wx   HOU. Elementary existence in general; in particular, that which renders this existence manifest and obvious; that which declares it to the senses.

In the analogue (arabic font), this root has not conserved the intellectual ideas of the Hebrew; but being reinforced in (arabic font), it has presented what is most profound in elementary existence, chaos.

vm   MSH. From the union of the sign of exterior activity with that of relative movement, or by contraction with the elementary root  va  springs a root whose purpose is to express that which is stirred by contractile movement. (French version: vm  MSH. De la réunion du signe de l'activité extérieure à celui du mouvement relatif, où par contraction à la R. élémentaire אש , naît une racine dont l'objet est d'exprimer tout ce qui se meut d'un mouvement contractile, se retire en soi, se touche, se met en masse)

The Arabic (arabic font) signifies properly to feel, touch softly, brush lightly.

vm   Everything palpable, compact, gathered: every pile, as a crop, a harvest. That which is drawn, extracted, shrunken, as silk etc.

vWm   (comp.) That which is contracted and rotted up in itself.

(  מש  . MSH. De la réunion du signe de l'activité extérieure à celui du mouvement relatif, où par contraction à la R. élémentaire אש , naît une racine dont l'objet est d'exprimer tout ce qui se meut d'un movement contractile, se retire en soi, se touche, se met en masse.

L'ar. مش signifie proprement palper, toucher mollement, frotter légèrement.

מש . Toute chose palpable, compacte, ramassée : tout amas, comme la récolte, la moisson. Tout ce qui se tire, s'extrait, se retire, comme la soie, etc.)


 

 

 

 

 

 

vv

 va      wv

6 Six: All the ideas of relative proportion towards every active principle, every relative force; all the ideas of relative proportion towards the basis and foundation of things; all the ideas of relative duration and relative movement.

 

D’Olivét’ note:   vv  Six. The root  Wv  contains all ideas of equality, of equilibrium, of fitness, of proportion in things. United to the sign of relative duration  v  in order to form the name of this number, it becomes the symbol of every proportional and relative measure. It is quite well known that the number six is applied in particular, to the measure of the circle, and in general, to all proportional measures. One finds in the feminine  tvv  and the Chaldaic reads  tv  which is not unlike the name of number two; furthermore, between these there exist great analogies, since six is to three, what two is to one; and since we have seen that three represented a sort of unity.

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

v   SH. This character as consonant belongs to the sibilant sound, and depicts in an onomatopoetic manner, light movements, sounds durable and soft. As symbolic image it represents the part of the bow from which the arrow is shot. In Hebrew, it is the sign of relative duration and of the movement attached thereunto. It is derived from the vocal sound  y  become consonant by joining to its expression the respective significations of the consonants  z  and  s  . As prepositive relation, it constitutes a sort of pronominal article and is placed at the head of nouns and verbs, to communicate to them the double power that it possesses of movement and of conjunction.

Wv   SHOU. Root analogous to the root  av  , but conceived principally under its relation of equilibrium, equality, parallel, similitude, fitness, proportion and measure of things.

hWv   State of being in equilibrium in all parts, as every portion of the circle; state of being equal, conformable, fitting, just, qualified for something; etc.

va   The Hebraic genius confounds this root with the root  sa  , and considers in it all that which is of the basis and foundation of things; that which is hidden in its principle; that which is absolute, strong, unalterable; as the appearance of fire. The Arabic (arabic font) designates that which moves with agility, vehemence. This idea ensues necessarily from that attached to the mobility of fire va

vWa   Action of founding, making solid, giving force and vigour.

vxa   (comp.) Power, majesty, splendour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

[bv

w[     ba     wv

7 Seven: The physical/material generation; the physical/material vivification; the physical/material becoming. All the ideas related making, vivifying, fecundating, creating the physical reality; to carry out the development, the physical growth.

 

D’Olivét’ note:  [bv  Seven. One can review v. 3, chapter II, wherein I have given the origin of this word and stated why I attach to it ideas of complement, of accomplishment, and of the consummation of things and of times.

D’Olivét’ note in v. 3, chapter II:  y[ybvh  the-seventh. This is the number of complete restitution, of cyclic fullness. It is true that  [bv  signifies seven, and that  y[ybv  can be taken for seventh or septenary; but the name of this number draws with it in the Hebraic tongue, the idea of the consummation of things, and of the fullness of times. One of the roots of which it is composed  bwv  and of which I am about to speak, expresses the idea of return to the place from which one had departed, and the one which is joined to it by contraction  w[  indicates every kind of curve, of inversion, of cycle.

The Hebrews make use of the verb  [Abv  to express the oath by virtue of which they affirm that a thing promised will be fulfilled.

All names of number have, in Hebrew, particular and often very deep significations: the abundance of new things upon which I was obliged to dwell in beginning, has forced me to neglect them; but as soon as I shall have more leisure, I shall make amends for my silence in this respect, as well as in some others.

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

  wv  SHOU. Root analogous to the root  av  , but conceived principally under its relation of equilibrium, equality, parallel, similitude, fitness, proportion and measure of things.

 

  ba  AB. The potential sign united to that of interior activity produces a root whence come all ideas of productive cause, efficient will, determining movement, generative force. In many ancient idioms and particularly in the Persian (persian fonts here), this root is applied especially to the aqueous element as principle of universal fructification.

  ba  AB All ideas of paternity. Desire to have: a father: fruit. In reflecting upon these different significations, which appear at first incongruous, one will perceive that they come from one another and are produced mutually.

The Arabic (arabic fonts) contains all the significations of the Hebraic root. As noun, it is father and paternity, fruit and fructification; that which is producer and produced; that which germinates and comes forth as verdure upon the earth.

As verb (1) it is the action of tending toward a desired end, proceeding, returning, etc.

  ba  or  bba  AB or ABB (intensive] That which grows, is propagated: vegetation, germination.

bWa   (comp.) This is, in a broader sense, the Universal Mystery, the Matrix of the Universe, the Orphic-Egg, the World, the Vessel of Isis, the Pythonic Mind: in a more restricted sense, belly; leather bottle, cavity, vase, etc.

bha  AHB (comp.) All ideas of love, sympathy, inclination, kindness. It is the sign of life  h  which gives to the idea of desire to have, contained in the root  ba  the movement of expansion which transforms it into that of love. It is, according to the etymological sense, that which

seeks to spread out.

 

h[   ,  W[  HEH, HOU. That which is sentient in general; obvious to the senses: physical reality. Superficies, the exterior form of things. Their growth, material development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

hnmv

 !m      v

8 Eight: All specification, classification by exterior forms; all figuration, determination, definition, distinction, qualification. The kind of things, their exterior figure; their proper measure, number, quota. The action of figuring, defining, forming an idea, an image of things: the action of imagining; the action of measuring, numbering, qualifying, etc.

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

v   SH. This character as consonant belongs to the sibilant sound, and depicts in an onomatopoetic manner, light movements, sounds durable and soft. As symbolic image it represents the part of the bow from which the arrow is shot. In Hebrew, it is the sign of relative duration and of the movement attached thereunto. It is derived from the vocal sound  y  become consonant by joining to its expression the respective significations of the consonants  z  and  s  . As prepositive relation, it constitutes a sort of pronominal article and is placed at the head of nouns and verbs, to communicate to them the double power that it possesses of movement and of conjunction.

!m   MN. This root, composed of the sign of exterior and passive action, united by contraction to the root  !a  , symbol of the sphere of activity and of the circumscriptive extent of being, characterizes all specification, all classification by exterior forms; all figuration, determination, definition, qualification.

The Arabic (arabic font) has not followed the same developments as the Hebrew, although they have come from an identical root in the two idioms, as is proved by the usage of this root as designative relation represented by of, from, etc. As noun the Arabic root (arabic font) designates a thing emanated from another, a gift; as verb, it characterizes the state of that which is benign, beneficial; action of that which is deprived in order to give, to distribute; that which is weakened to reinforce, impoverished to enrich, etc.

!m   The kind of things, their exterior figure, mien, image, that is conceived; the idea, that is formed, the definition that is given to it; their proper measure, number, quota.

!Wm   Action of figuring, defining, forming an idea, an image of things: action of imagining; action of measuring, numbering, qualifying, etc.

!ym   Form, aspect of things; their mien, figure, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

[vt

 [v     at

9 Nine. Every idea of determination, designation of conservation, cementation; which consolidates, guarantees, preserves. The action of designing, characterizing the conservation, cementation.

 

D’Olivét’ note:  [vt  nine. The root  [v  which signifies literally, lime, cement, draws with it all ideas of cementation, consolidation, restoration, conservation, etc. The verb  [wv  which comes from it, expresses the action of cementing, plastering, closing carefully. Therefore the name of this number, being visibly composed of this root  [v  governed by the sign of reciprocity  t  should be understood as cementation, as mutual consolidation.

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

at   THA. Every idea of determination, designation, definition.

hat   That which limits, determines, defines, circumscribes. It is, in a restricted sense, the nuptial chamber.

[v   SHUH. Every idea of conservation, restoration, cementation.

[v   In a literal sense, lime, cement; in a figurative sense, that which consolidates, guarantees; which serves as safe-guard; which preserves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

rf[

  rf      [

10 Ten. Every idea of opening, liberation of that which is material, the physical reality, the exterior form of things. That which liberates, opens, brings out, emits the matter, the physical reality, the exterior form of things (as if a closed circle were opened; as if a chain were slackened).

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

h[    W[  HEH, HOU. That which is sentient in general; obvious to the senses: physical reality. Superficies, the exterior form of things. Their growth, material development.

 

rv   SHR. This root admits of several significations, according to its composition. If it is the sign of relative movement which is united simply to that of movement proper, there results from this abstract mingling of the circular line with the straight line, an idea of solution, opening, liberation; as if a closed circle were opened; as if a chain were slackened: if one considers this same sign of relative movement, being united by contraction to the elementary root  ra  , then it partakes of the diverse expressions of this root and develops ideas of strength, vigour, domination, power, which result from the elementary principle; if finally, one sees in the root  rv  the root  Wv  symbol of all harmonious proportion, joined to the sign of movement proper, one discovers here the expression of that which is directed according to just and upright laws; thence, according to the first signification:

rv   That which liberates, opens, brings out, emits, produces; as the navel, a field, etc.; according to the second:

rv   or  rrv  (intens.) That which is solid, firm, resisting, as a wall., breast-plate, chain; that which is strong, vigorous, as a bull; that which is dominating, powerful, as a king, a prince; that which is formidable, as a rival, an enemy, etc.; according to the third:

rv  ,  rWv  or  ryv  That which is measured, coordinate, just, conformable with universal harmony, restricted to regulations, as a musical song, a melody, a law, a poem, a system of government, etc.

The Hebraic genius merging these three expressions in one, draws from it the most complicated and most abstract sense that any tongue can offer: that of a government, liberal, ready, indulgent, productive within; powerful, strong, redoubtable, dominating without, which extends its empire by directing it according to just, luminous laws modelled upon the immutable laws of order and universal harmony.

The Arabic (arabic font) does not agree with the Hebrew in the radical sense, except in certain of its compounds and in its analogues (arabic font) and (arabic font). This root, in the Arabic idiom has become intensive, and has developed ideas wholly contrary, as has been seen often in the course of this vocabulary. Thus, instead of order and justice expressed by  rv  the intensive verb  rrv  or (arabic font), characterizes the action of that which is inordinate, unjust, wicked, perfidious, contrary to harmony and public welfare.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ham

  ham

100. Hundred. What has developed into the entire extension of its faculties.

 

D’Olivét’ note:  ham  or  tam  one hundred. The name of this number indicates an extension produced by the desire to be extended, to be manifested. The root of this word  tWa  literally desire, is here governed by the sign of exterior action  m  One finds the Arabic (arabic font) expressing

to extend and to dilate. In nearly all the tongues of Asia, mah signifies great.

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

am   MA. That which tends to the aggrandizement of its being, to its entire development; that which serves as instrument of generative power and manifests it exteriorly.

The Arabic (arabic font) presents in its original sense the same ideas as the Hebraic root; but this root has acquired in Arabic a greater number of developments than it has in Hebrew; this is why it demands in both idioms all the attention of those who wish to go back to the essence of language.

am  or (arabic font) characterizes in general, passive matter, the thing of which, with which, and by means of which, all is made. It is in particular, in the Arabic idiom, water; anything whatsoever, all or nothing, according to the manner in which it is considered. This important root, conceived as pronominal relation designates the possibility of all things, and is represented by the analogues

what and which; conceived, on the contrary, as adverbial relation, it is employed in Arabic to express the absence of every determined object and is rendered by the analogues not, no. As verb, the root (arabic font) or (arabic font) signifies in general, to go everywhere, to extend everywhere, to fill space, etc.

ham   This is, in general, that which is developed according to the extent of its faculties; in a more restricted sense it is the number one hundred.

 

 

 

 

 

 

~Ayð

 ~y     Ay 

Day: The luminous manifestation of the matter

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

~Ay   (comp.) The luminous, continued, universalized manifestation: day. See  ~y

~Ay   (comp.) Day; that is to say, universal luminous manifestation. See  Ay

Ay   IO. Every luminous manifestation; everything intelligible.

This root no longer exists in Arabic in its primitive simplicity. It is found only in the Coptic word (coptic font) to designate the moon; it is rather remarkable that the same Arabic word (arabic font) designates the sun. This last word, in receiving the guttural aspiration in (arabic font) signifies literally the day, and is used sometimes in place of (arabic font).

 

~y   IM. The sign of manifestation united to that of exterior action as collective sign, composes a root whose purpose is to indicate universal manifestation and to develop all ideas of mass and accumulation.

The intellectual force of this root is weakened in Arabic, since this idiom has not conserved the characterization of the plurality of things as in Hebrew. It is the root (arabic font), whose expression is much less forceful, which has replaced it; also, the manner of forming the plurals of nouns with numberless anomalies and irregularities, has become one of the greatest difficulties of the Arabic tongue.

~y   In a literal and restricted sense, the sea; that is to say, the universal aqueous manifestation, the mass of waters.

As noun, the Arabic (arabic font), signifies the sea, and as verb, to submerge. This word is preserved in the Coptic (coptic font), and appears not to be foreign to the Japanese umi.

 

 

 

 

 

 

vdx

 vd      wx

Month. Germination, propagation of the existence.

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

wx   HOU. Elementary existence in general; in particular, that which renders this existence manifest and obvious; that which declares it to the senses.

vd   DSH. Every idea of germination, vegetation, elementary propagation.

vWd   In a broad sense, action of giving the seed; and in a more restricted sense that of thrashing the grain, triturating.

 

 

 

 

 

 

hnv

  !v 

Year. Every idea of mutation, of variation, of passing from one state to another; a temporal mutation, relative to the being which is its object.

 

D’Olivét’ note: These names are not placed undesignedly or simply introduced in chronological

order, as has been supposed. Those who have understood them in their strict acceptations, and who have taken them literally as being applied to days, months or years, have proved their ignorance or their bad faith. To believe that Moses has really restricted to a duration of six days, such as we understand them today, the act of universal creation, or that he here restricts the lives of the cosmogonic beings of which he speaks, to a certain number of years such as we calculate them, is to do him gratuitous injury, and treat him in this respect, as one would treat an orator whose eloquence one condemns before learning the tongue in which the orator is expressing himself.

I believe I have made it sufficiently understood that the word  ~Ay  day, by which Moses designates the phenomenal manifestations of the act of the creation, should be applied to a certain revolution of light, which the genius of this wonderful man, or of his instructors, had foreseen. In the note which follows I shall explain, that the word  hnv  which has been translated by year, signifies an ontological, temporal duration; that is to say, relative to the diverse mutations of the being to which it is applied. […] I now return to this word which the length of the preceding note forced me to slight. The Hellenists, and Saint Jerome following these unreliable masters, have rendered it by (greek font), "annus", a year. But they have, as is their custom, restricted what. was taken in a broad sense, and applied to a particular revolution, that which was applicable to an universal, ontological revolution. I have already spoken of this word in v. 14. Ch. I. Its root is  !v  which we have just now seen to be that of number two and containing every idea of mutation, of variation, of passing from one state to another. Thus the word  hnv  expresses a temporal mutation, relative to the being which is its object. The Hebraic tongue has several terms for expressing the idea of temporal duration.  dw[  characterizes the same state continued, an actual duration; as relation, we translate it by still;  vdx  carries the idea of a beginning of existence, either in the order of things, or in the order of time: in its most restricted sense, it means a monthly duration;  hnv  is applied to the transition of this same existence, to a mutation of the being: that is to say, that the being which is its object, is not found at the end of the period which it expresses, at the same point or in the same state that it was at its beginning: in the more restricted sense, it is the space of a year: finally, the last of these terms is  bwv  which should mean every revolution which replaces the being in its original state. These divers periods, always relative to the being to which they are applied, can mean the most limited duration, as well as that whose limits escape the human understanding.

The numbers one, two and seven take their roots from this.

It is because the ancient periods have been restricted and particularized, that one has so badly understood the Sethites of the Egyptians, the Saros of the Chaldeans, the Yogas of the Brahmans, etc.

 

RADICAL VOCABULARY:

!v   SHN. All ideas of mutation, iteration, passing from one state to another; that which leads to diversity, variation, change.

The Arabic (arabic font) agrees with the Hebraic root only in certain compounds, and in the analogue (arabic font). As verb, (arabic font) indicates the action of triturating, crushing, making noise.

!v   The number two. Literally, that which cuts and divides as the teeth; figuratively, hatred. That which varies, changes; that which measures and divides time; a cyclic revolution, an ontological mutation; in a very restricted sense, a year.

 

 

 

 

 

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